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Amid Mines and Barbed Wire, Wildlife Thrives in a Cold War No Man’s Land

May 11, 2006
"It's easy to see wild cats and boars around here. Sometimes I see badgers, weasels and elk,"
- South Korean Sgt. Lee Jae-ho

"Many of the species you find in the DMZ or the CCZ are no longer found in the rest of the country,"
- South Korean Sgt. Lee Jae-ho

Yanggu, South Korea - Within earshot of a truckload of South Korean troops, a family of wild boars approaches a military base looking for an afternoon snack. Just down the road, water deer dash into a forest dotted with mines.

Off-limits to most civilians for more than 50 years and separating some 2 million soldiers of the two Koreas, this Demilitarized Zone is the world's most heavily fortified border.

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