World  |  Environment  |  Science & Technology  |  Health  |  Human Rights  |  Feel Good  |  Regions
Great News Network
Spread the word:

Madagascar Gets Biggest Lemur Park

August 17, 2012
"Makira Natural Park also will protect some less cuddly creatures, including the Madagascar serpent eagle and the island's only large predator, the cat-like fossa, which eats lemurs and needs large areas of intact forest to maintain healthy populations,"
- Wildlife Conservation Society

Good news for lemurs: Officials in Madagascar have created the island's biggest protected wildlife park. Named Makira Natural Park, the area is larger than the state of than the state of Rhode Island, and it provides a habitat for the highest diversity of lemurs on the planet, the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) announced.

The park stretches over 1,438 square miles (372,470 hectares) of rainforest in northeastern Madagascar and contains 20 of the island’s 103 lemur species, including the red-ruffed lemur and the silky sifaka, WCS officials said. Lemurs, found only in Madagascar, were recently named the most endangered group of vertebrates on Earth. Along with lorises and bushbabies, lemurs belong to a group called prosimian primates, defined as all primates that are neither monkeys nor apes.

Makira Natural Park also will protect some less cuddly creatures, including the Madagascar serpent eagle and the island's only large predator, the cat-like fossa, which eats lemurs and needs large areas of intact forest to maintain healthy populations, WCS said.

image
This red-ruffed lemur is one of the largest primates of Madagascar with a body length of 20 inches (53 centimeters), a tail length of 24 inches (60 cm) and a weight of up to 9 pounds (4 kilograms). CREDIT: Astrid Lenz

Continue reading on Live Science article opens in new window 
[Broken link?]


Comment on this story

More Great News

 

Recommendations

About

The Great News Network is meant to supplement your daily news sources - not replace it. It's role is to show that there is hope, people are making a difference, and that a lot of things are getting better.

Optimism is a great catalyst for making the world a better place. When we can see there is hope, then we'll be more compelled to make the effort to do our part.

© 2003-2019 GNN